From the bean to the chocolate bar

Experience more over the history of the cocoa bean....
 

To make 1 kg (2.2 pounds) of chocolate, about 300 to 600 beans are processed, depending on the desired cocoa content. In a factory, the beans are washed and roasted.


Next they are de-hulled by a "nibber" machine that also removes the germ. The nibs are ground between three sets of stones into a thick creamy paste.

This "liquor" is converted to cocoa powder by removing part of its fatty oils (the "cocoa butter") using a hydraulic press or the Broma
process. This process produces around 50% cocoa butter and 50% cocoa powder.


Standard cocoa powder has a fat content of approximately 10-12 percent. The extracted fatty oils are used in confectionery, soaps, and cosmetics.

                       

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The Aztec and Mayans of Central America cultivated cocoa trees long before the arrival of European explorers. These Mesoamerican Indians were the first to create a drink from crushed cocoa beans mixed with water and flavorings such as chili peppers, vanilla, and other spices. It was a special beverage reserved for Mayan rulers and special ceremonies.

The word cacao itself derives from the Nahuatl (Aztec language) word cacahuatl. The Mayan used cocoa beans also as currency.

The Maya believed that the kakaw (cacao) was discovered by the gods in a mountain that also contained other deletable foods to be used by the Maya.

The invading Spaniards learned about cocoa from the Aztec Indians in the 1500s and brought this fascinating “new” food back to Europe.

Chocolate slowly spread across the royal courts of Europe, and by the 17th century it was an expensive luxury reserved for the upper class.

The cacao plant was first given its botanical name by Swedish natural scientist Carl von Linné (1707-1778), who called it “Theobroma (Food of the gods) cacao”.

Kontakt

Bohnkaf-Kolonial GmbH & Co. KG

Veit-Stoss-Ring 65

D-24539 Neumünster Germany

+49 (0) 4321 / 556 22 08

+49 (0) 4321 / 556 22 09

info@bohnkaf-kolonial.de

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